Journal Contents 2011

Issue No. 46 – Summer 2011

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Front cover: This delightful Edwardian postcard has almost everything that a transport enthusiast might want — a viaduct, train, bridge, river (the River Anker), car and bicycle; and even a donkey. The lady and gentleman in the car were possibly from Bole Hall, just beyond the viaduct and whose grounds were amongst the trees. The cartoon execution is very unusual, but is very effective here. Why it was produced and for whom is, presently, unknown. At least one person bought a copy of this card, the example in the Burrows collection at the Study Centre. The Anker viaduct was one of the two major structures on the Birmingham and Derby Junction Railway, and we present a photograph of it on page 10. [Roy F. Burrows Midland Collection Trust, No. 23660: MR Study Centre]

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Back cover: Whilst I was putting the penultimate touches to the copy for this issue of our Journal, I received a message from Ashley Sanders on the Midland Railway Society email discussion group pointing out that the old Midland Grand Hotel was to be re-opened in March as the ‘St Pancras Renaissance Hotel’. So, since you will get this copy of the Journal at about the same time as the hotel re-opens, the item on the back cover seems especially appropriate. It is from a folded four-sided handbill produced for Midland Hotels. We display the front cover of the handbill, which describes, on the remaining three pages, the facilities available at the Midland’s hotels. Although undated, the dress of the attractive young lady on the cover suggests that the handbill was produced about 1918. For anyone contemplating staying at the re-opened hotel, you will have to dig deeply into your pockets, as the prices start at £250 per night, and that is for a room in the extension at the back, not the renovated rooms in the old Midland Grand itself, which are much more expensive. [Roy F. Burrows Midland Collection Trust, No. 13821: MR Study Centre.]

Issue No. 47 — Autumn 2011

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Front cover: Kevin Law was the photographer of this lovely wintry scene at Selside in March 2001. We see No. 156479 in the now defunct Northern Spirit livery as it passed a snow-covered Penyghent on the 14.45 Leeds to Carlisle working. Since 2001 was the year when foot and mouth restrictions throughout the countryside closed all public footpaths, photographs such as this had to be taken from the side of the roads. This put Kevin in the same position as the photographer a century earlier who took the picture we publish on page 1. Another set of former railway cottages can be seen in the distance on the right. Note how the abutments of the occupation bridge in this image are asymmetrical, just as in the MR period photograph. This is then clearly the location of the MR photograph. [Kevin Law collection]

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Back cover: We hear a lot these days about metal (mainly copper) thefts from the railways. However, the disappearance of tonnage quantities of metal from the railway system was not unknown in Midland Railway days, as the notice reproduced on our back cover shows. It is not clear from the wording whether or not the pig iron disappeared at York, or wagon No. 11548 was booked out of York as an empty (but actually contained the iron), and the iron disappeared somewhere between York and Burton. If it were the latter, the likely place for the iron to have ended up would have been in one of the scrap years of Sheffield. I suppose that we will never know if the Midland ever traced this consignment. [Roy F. Burrows Midland Collection Trust, Nos. 23689. MR Study Centre]

Issue No. 48 — Winter 2011

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Front cover: the photograph of the interior of Carlisle Citadel station that is the basis for this coloured postcard was probably taken in the early 1900s. It depicts an up Caledonian train having arrived at Platform 5 hauled by a Dunalastair 4–4–0, with a L&NWR engine and set of carriages ready on the nearer of the two centre roads to take it forward. The Midland interest lies in the activities depicted on Platform 2 (on the left) and in the set of three Midland carriages in the bay on the right, No. 1 bay, or one of the two ‘North Eastern’ bays. It throws some light on the timetabling issues raised by David Wrottesley in his article (page 14.) In addition, Garth Ponsonby has used this postcard to develop some details of train workings from Carlisle at the the time, and we print his discussion inside at page 4. [Roy F. Burrows Midland Collection Trust, No. 06398: Midland Railway Study Centre]

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Back cover: Reading this poster must break the heart of anyone who cares about history and the terrible things that human beings do to each other, especially when the agents of those things are institutions and other organisations. During the Great Irish Famine of 1845–52, some 1 million people died needlessly. A consequence was mass emigration from Ireland, an exodus that continued for many years after; another million or so had left by 1852. This catastrophe mainly affected the west of the country, where chronic unemployment continued throughout the 19th century. As we can see from this poster, despite this large pool of indigenous agricultural labour, the landowners in the east preferred to attract men from England for the harvest of 1860. One also wonders what drove men in the east midlands counties of England to spend substantially more than a week’s wages for their fare to Ireland, for work that they might not even secure when they got there. [Roy F. Burrows Midland Collection Trust, No.13645: Midland Railway Study Centre]